Debit or cash?

American Express, Bank of America, Barclaycard, and Chase are just some of the debit/credit companies offered to the public.

By Jennifer Delgado ’17

When you’re eating out with friends or simply shopping, you will realize that most of them will pull out their debit cards. However, some still carry around cash, mostly because their parents have not allowed them to have a card. Although many pride themselves for having a debit card, others know there are some drawbacks to having one, and so having to carry around cash everywhere they go doesn’t bother them.

Some parents believe it is unnecessary to open up a bank account because there’s no need to if the money is only going to be used for emergencies or buying food.

Karla Concepcion, a senior, has a debit card in order for her paychecks to get directly deposited to her card. She mentions that it’s easier to track her money, whereas cash is harder to keep up with, counting how much money you have left each time you make a purchase.

You will realize that most teens have a PNC Bank Virtual Wallet debit card or a Chase Bank debit card.

Liliana Ramirez, a junior, said that her parents will not open up a bank account for her until she goes off to college. “I don’t really go out, so they find no need to open up a bank account for me. They do want to open one up when I go to college to make it easier to put money in my card when I need it.”

Concepcion, having a Chase bank account, said that it allows her to “transfer money to another Chase bank account, quick pay, instead of giving someone cash.”

Senior Vanessa Banderas joked about how one of her bad habits of having a debit card is the struggle to avoid online shopping. She stated, “My mom has [my] paychecks directly deposited.{I get] $50 into my account every two weeks, and so once the money accumulates, it’s difficult to not impulsively order off of Forever 21.”

Business Insider stated, “no overdrafts, no effect on credit score, easy to reload, easy to access and track, protection against emergencies,” as some of the benefits of having a prepaid debit card.

Others, however, find no withdrawals from not having a debit card. Sophomore Cristian Crespo mentioned how he doesn’t mind carrying around cash. “I wouldn’t like to deal with having to pay fees when withdrawing money from an ATM.” When asked about whether he thinks it’s safe for him to always carrying cash, he said, “It’s not like I stunt how much money I have. I carry around $20 dollars at most, except when I’m going out shopping. I know to keep most of my money safe at home.”

Business Insider stated, “no overdrafts, no effect on credit score, easy to reload, easy to access and track, protection against emergencies,” as some of the benefits of having a prepaid debit card.

Whether you have a debit card or only have cash, it’s important to know your limits and safety. Don’t mention in public how much you have in your card or how much cash you have in your pocket. This could end in a possible robbery. Regardless, the way one pays shouldn’t affect the way you perceive someone. Money is money.